Segments in this Video

Uighur Clashes (01:25)

FREE PREVIEW

Stephen McDonnell reports from China's Xianjiang border region. The government blames ethnic Muslim militants for recent violence.

Uighur Violence (Disturbing images) (02:20)

McDonnell is stopped at a roadblock at Xianjiang. Media censorship keeps the crackdown a mystery; view footage of jihadists driving a car into a Tiananmen Square crowd.

Xianjiang Demographics (02:13)

Government sponsored Han migrants comprise 50% of the population. McDonnell visits a traditional fabric shop in a Uighur neighborhood.

Uighur Ethnic Minority (00:44)

Turkic speaking Sunni Muslims have been ruled by warlords, Mongolians, and Chinese emperors. McDonnell samples local bread.

Uighur Restrictions (01:05)

Members of the minority aren't allowed to travel outside their city. McDonnell's camera crew attracts police attention.

Chinese Police Harassment (01:13)

McDonnell's car is confiscated at a check point in Xianjiang. He convinces guards to allow his translator to continue.

Chinese Surveillance (01:41)

Government personnel escort McDonnell in Shanshan and say his crew is violating interview procedures—but allow them to film scenery.

Xianjiang Tourism Issues (01:36)

McDonnell films Shanshan sand dunes with government escorts. Recent violence has reduced visitors, but he's not allowed to interview Uighur people.

Surveillance in Turpan (02:35)

Chinese government escorts follow McDonnell's crew around their hotel. However, he is allowed to set up an interview with an Imam.

Religious Monitoring (02:16)

McDonnell interviews an Imam under Chinese supervision. He is puzzled by recent Uighur violence and must balance cooperation with loyalty to his people.

Urumqi Terrorist Attack (02:44)

McDonnell's crew passes security checks on the way to the Xianjiang capital. A policeman shares his reaction to recent Uighur violence against the Han population.

Uighur Integration Policy (00:36)

The Chinese government offers Han and Uighur residents money to intermarry. The Uighur language is disappearing from schools.

Chinese Government Oppression (02:47)

Uighurs are still a majority in southern Xianjiang. Farmers refuse to discuss recent violence with McDonnell, but admit they are treated worse than other ethnic groups.

Terrorism Allegations (02:12)

McDonnell tries to investigate recent violence in an Uighur town, during which 100 people were killed when a mob attacked government buildings. Chinese authorities force him to leave.

Uighur Conflict Theories (01:43)

In Kashgar, McDonnell questions whether violence has been caused by international jihadists, local unrest, or colonialism.

Chinese Government Crackdown (01:19)

Uighurs involved in attacks have been arrested and an economist imprisoned for criticizing Xianjiang policies. Some warn this could increase religious extremism.

Credits: China: Crackdown (00:24)

Credits: China: Crackdown

For additional digital leasing and purchase options contact a media consultant at 800-257-5126
(press option 3) or sales@films.com.

China: Crackdown


DVD (Chaptered) Price: $169.95
DVD + 3-Year Streaming Price: $254.93
3-Year Streaming Price: $169.95

Share

Description

As several nations join the fight against ISIS—the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria—China is intensifying its crackdown on a resident Muslim community in the remote northwest of the country in what it claims is its own war on terror. The Uighurs have inhabited the sprawling and spectacular Xinjiang province for centuries, but cells of violent separatists have brought a crackdown from Beijing that's making life extremely difficult for the law-abiding majority. Amid claims the Communist government is trying to erase the Uighur heritage and as authorities impose new barriers to reporting in China, Stephen McDonell heads into Silk Road territory and one of China's most sensitive issues—which explains the shadowy, ever-growing team sent to follow him.

Length: 30 minutes

Item#: BVL65067

ISBN: 978-1-60057-921-9

Copyright date: ©2014

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video customers.

Only available in USA and Canada.


Share