Segments in this Video

Introduction: Life Explodes: Australia's First 4 Billion Years (01:50)

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Dr. Richard Smith reviews the last episode, highlighting events from the Earth's creation to the Cambrian period.

Ordovician Era (03:48)

Oceans were rising around the planet. Smith visits Simpson Desert, Northern Territory to see the fossil of the world's earliest fish.

Silurian Era (04:03)

Smith visits Kalbarri, Western Australia to explore where the first animals took to land. Learn about the strange sea creatures that walked.

Land Plants (03:53)

Smith travels to Yea, Victoria to see the early plant fossils. Direct descendants of the Silurian plants can be found today.

MacDonell Mountain Range (04:00)

Plant life created an Ozone layer to protect the Earth. Learn about the mountains that arose on the supercontinent Gondwana.

Erosion (03:43)

The rivers mostly drain inland, and have lost the ability to carry sediment out to the ocean. Smith explores the Bungle Bungle Range, Western Australia.

Devonian Era (03:20)

Smith visits the great Devonian barrier reef. These limestone cliffs used to be part of a colossal underwater reef system.

Gogo Fish (02:40)

For the first time, fish filled the oceans. Smith goes searching for Gogo fish fossils.

Reproduction (03:01)

Smith views the fossil of a male fish as well as a mother with child.

Lungfish (02:12)

Lungfish moved from salt to freshwater in the Devonian period and they also learned to breathe without their gills.

Evolution (04:07)

Several species of fish were found perfectly preserved underground in Australia. One of these fossils shows evidence of walking.

Carboniferous Era (03:39)

This time period saw all sorts of new plants, huge forests, and reptiles laying eggs. The greening of the Earth began to turn Australia red.

Permian Era (02:00)

The supercontinent Gondwana moves south and another ice age begins. Smith visits the Fleurieu Peninsula, South Australia to see rocks that were marred by glaciers.

Fossils (03:38)

Smith travels to Maria Island, Tasmania to learn about the many Permian shellfish.

Permian Era Ends (03:27)

Massive volcanic eruptions changed the atmosphere of the Earth and over 80% of all species died.

Credits: Life Explodes: Australia's First 4 Billion Years (01:38)

Credits: Life Explodes: Australia's First 4 Billion Years

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Life Explodes: Australia's First 4 Billion Years

Part of the Series : Australia's First 4 Billion Years
3-Year Streaming Price: $169.95

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Description

How did life storm the beaches and dominate planet Earth? Ancient Australian fossils offer clues. While the oceans were teeming, the world above the waves remained an almost lifeless wasteland — until the Silurian period. Host Richard Smith introduces Earth’s forgotten pioneers: the scuttling arthropod armies that invaded the shores and the waves of green revolutionaries whose battle for the light pushed plant life across the face of a barren continent. Join NOVA’s prehistoric adventure as four-legged animals walk onto dry land, with the planet poised for disaster.

Length: 55 minutes

Item#: BVL58716

Copyright date: ©2013

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video, Dealer and Publisher customers.

Only available in USA and Canada.


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