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Pope, Poverty, and Poetry Introduction (02:00)

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This segment orients viewers to the conversation between Moyers, Thomas Cahill, and Poet Laureate Philip Levin about the new Pope Francis and giving voice to the voiceless. (Credits and Sponsors)

New Kind of Pope (02:35)

Moyers quotes Pope Francis' position on wealth, lack of concern for the human being, and the plight of the unemployed. Moyers introduces Jesuit educated author, Thomas Cahill.

Recent Papal Surprises (05:43)

Thomas Cahill discusses, "Heretics and Heroes." He believes politicians, like clergy, should care for their flock. Cahill discusses papal surprises and Pope Francis' recent Exhortation.

Christian Actions and Jesus's Teachings (04:01)

Moyers and Cahill discuss the Pope's reference to a deified market. Cahill discusses religious discrepencies and the subconscious links between belief, cruelty, and sex.

Institutionalized Exclusion (01:57)

Pope Francis' message of inclusion does not include women as priests. Cahill discusses traditional resistance and reform. Moyers asks if monotheism encourages intolerance of other beliefs.

Thomas Cahill's Personal Beliefs (03:18)

Cahill calls all sectionalism of Christianity stupid. Pope Francis speaks to all Christians. Cahill says he is a believing Christian, equally at ease and ill at ease in any church.

Poet Philip Levine (03:30)

Moyers discusses Black Friday demonstrations around the country and fast food workers' demands to raise the minimum wage. Moyers introduces Poet Laureate Philip Levine .

Industrial Detroit (03:22)

Scenes of Detroit factories in the 1940's accompany Levine's conversation about his experience in the GE factory. He reads, "An Abandoned Factory, Detroit."

The Burning City of Detroit (03:20)

Philip Levine reads, "Coming Home, Detroit, 1968." He discusses the hostility he felt in the city and the industrial smokestacks that inspired his poem.

Strength of Black Survivors (07:15)

Philip Levine reads "They Feed They Lion." He discusses his realization that Black America will win their struggles by their own strength.

Poems of Women at Work (06:20)

Philip Levine reads, "The Helmet." His inspiration came from working with women plating plumbing parts. He reads "Coming Close."

Levine's Writing Process (03:04)

Philip Levine describes feeling in control even when inspired, but loving the poems he had to toil over. He explains that poems come through some creative source.

Writing from a Place of Anger (06:40)

American capitalism and racism anger Philip Levine the most. He reads "What Work Is."

Being Poet Laureate (01:40)

Philip Levine describes his year as Poet Laureate. He relished reading his poems to union workers, and especially took pleasure in having his work read.

Credits: Moyers & Company: The Pope, Poverty, and Poetry (01:51)

Credits: Moyers & Company: The Pope, Poverty, and Poetry

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Moyers & Company: The Pope, Poverty, and Poetry


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Description

In just a few months, Pope Francis has proven to be one of the most outspoken pontiffs in recent history, especially when it comes to the widening gap between the rich and poor. In this episode of Moyers & Company Bill talks to author and historian Thomas Cahill to get his perspective on what the actions of Pope Francis could mean for the future of the church and why he has some conservatives up in arms. Also on the broadcast, poet Philip Levine joins Bill to discuss why Americans have lost sight of those who really keep the country afloat—the hardworking men and women who toil, unsung and unknown, in our nation’s fields and factories. Levine himself worked on the assembly lines of Detroit’s auto plants, and his experience inspired several of his poems. Described by one critic as “a large, ironic Whitman of the industrial heartland,” Levine recently served as the nation’s poet laureate at the Library of Congress. Broadcast date: December 27, 2013.

Length: 57 minutes

Item#: BVL56316

ISBN: 978-0-81609-307-6

Copyright date: ©2013

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video customers.

Only available in USA and Canada.


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