Segments in this Video

Deep Underground (02:13)

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Archaeology is different from written history. This segment orients viewers to Richard Miles' pursuit of an archaeological quest to better understand the foundation of civilization.

Herculaneum Theater (01:46)

In the shadow of Mount Vesuvius, Richard Miles discusses the discovery of marble in 1709. While digging for marble, workers discovered a Roman theater buried since 79 AD.

Ancient Roman Cities (02:20)

In 1709, Elbeuf dug vertical shafts to recover artifacts from the Herculaneum Theater. In 1738, Alcubierre discovered the rest of Herculaneum and the city of Pompeii.

Changing Archaeology (03:28)

Archaeological attention turned to the Middle East; Napoleon explored Egypt in 1798. Richard Miles views a contemporary record of Napoleon's expedition.

Public Institutions Democratized Archaeology (02:14)

Giovanni Belzoni arrived in Egypt and shifted a Ramses II statue. In 1818, the statue arrived in London. By the 19th century, national museums held collections for public viewing.

Discovering Ancient Egypt (03:55)

In the early 19th century, academia became interested in archaeology. The Rosetta Stone, discovered in 1799, took 20 years to decipher. Richard Miles views an 1801 copy of the stone's engravings.

Academics Discovered a New Age (02:28)

Photography helped academics record findings. Some Egyptian artifacts were lost and photographs became essential for study. See some of the first archaeological photographs.

Cuneiform Tablets (02:29)

Richard Miles examines tablet photographs. In the 19th century, Julius Oppert analyzed the cuneiform writing and discovered that the beginning of civilization was much older than Egypt.

Chiapas, Mexico (04:39)

John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood explored Mexico in the 1830s and found Palenque; Richard Miles follows their footsteps.

Palenque (04:11)

Richard Miles explores the ancient city. John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood believed they found a new, independent ancient culture.

Revealing the Past through Science (03:00)

By the mid-19th century, academia realized that archaeology was complex. Heinrich Schliemann organized the expedition that discovered Troy.

Discovering Troy and More (03:46)

Heinrich Schliemann arrived in Turkey in 1871; he was the first archaeologist to dig test pits and use stratigraphy. See images from his excavation,

Troy and its Enemy (03:16)

Heinrich Schliemann turned his attention to Mycenaean Greece. Richard Miles follows the analytical chemistry Schliemann used to find a link between Troy and Mycenae.

Wiltshire, England (04:00)

Gen. Augustus Henry Lane-Fox Pitt Rivers regularly excavated Cranborne Chase. Richard Miles explores the remnants of Pitt Rivers' excavations.

Father of Modern Scientific Archaeology (04:20)

Richard Miles examines the precise records and models Gen. Augustus Henry Lane-Fox Pitt Rivers' made during his meticulous excavation of Cranborne Chase.

Archaeological Progression (01:38)

Gen. Augustus Henry Lane-Fox Pitt Rivers stored the human remains he found while excavating Cranborne Chase. Richard Miles reviews the transformation of archaeological technology.

Preview (00:48)

See a preview of the next episode of Archaeology--A Secret History.

Credits: The Search for Civilization: Archaeology--A Secret History (00:44)

Credits: The Search for Civilization: Archaeology--A Secret History

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The Search for Civilization (Archaeology: A Secret History)

Part of the Series : Archaeology: A Secret History
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Description

Archaeologist Richard Miles presents a series charting the history of the breakthroughs and watersheds in our long quest to understand our ancient past. He shows how discoveries in the 18th and 19th centuries overturned ideas of when and where civilization began, as empires competed to literally 'own' the past. (52 minutes)

Length: 52 minutes

Item#: BVL55739

ISBN: 978-0-81609-280-2

Copyright date: ©2013

Closed Captioned

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Not available to Home Video and Publisher customers.


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