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Great African-American Poetry: "Gone Boy" (00:20)

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Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee recite "Gone Boy" by Langston Hughes. Because a man stays out all night, he misses work. This performance is from an episode of "Camera Three" in which Davis and Dee perform poetry about the African-American experience.

"Motto" (00:10)

Davis and Dee recite the poem by Hughes. The narrator explains that by liking others, he survives living in the ghetto.

"Wake" (00:04)

Davis recites the poem by Hughes. Hughes asks the mourners to wear red because his death makes no sense.

"Maybe" (00:07)

Dee recites the poem by Hughes. The narrator asks if his or her significant other understands her point of view.

"Hope" (00:13)

Davis recites the poem by Hughes. A wife decides to play her dying husband's dream number.

"Still Here" (00:18)

Dee recites the poem by Hughes. The narrator explains how natural forces are against her, but she is resilient.

"Bad Morning" (00:05)

Davis recites the poem by Hughes. The narrator is frustrated because his shoes are mismatched.

"Final Curve" (00:09)

Dee recites the poem by Hughes. Watch an excerpt of the performance.

"Quiet Girl" (01:03)

Davis and Dee recite the poem. The two actors co-starred in "A Raisin in the Sun." Today on "Camera Three," Davis and Dee chose to perform selections of African-American poetry. (Credits)

"Apology for Rhyming" (00:35)

Dee performs the poem written by Davis. Watch an excerpt of the performance.

"First to a Suicide" (00:46)

Davis performs a poem he wrote.

"Pete at the Zoo" (00:17)

Davis performs a poem written by Gwendolyn Brooks. The author compares herself to an elephant.

"We Real Cool" (00:32)

Dee recites the poem by Brooks. Dropouts think they will die soon.

"Kitchenette Building" (00:47)

Dee and Davis perform the poem. The family defers their dreams in order to survive.

"Madam and the Census Man" (00:38)

Dee recites the poem by Hughes. A woman gets frustrated when a census worker attempts to change her name.

"Madam and the Rent Man" (00:33)

Davis recites the poem by Hughes. A tenant fights back against an apartment agent who will not fix up the apartment.

"Me and the Mule" (00:16)

Davis recites the poem by Hughes about racial pride.

"Morning After" (00:40)

Davis recites the poem by Hughes. The narrator drank some bad alcohol and woke to his wife snoring.

"Homecoming" (00:17)

Davis recites the poem by Hughes. A man arrives home to discover his lover has left him.

"The Old-Marrieds" (00:35)

Dee recites the poem by Brooks that creates a portrait of an aging couple.

"A Toast" (00:28)

Davis recites the poem by Frank Horne. A lover muses on the object of his desire.

"Border Line" (00:19)

Dee recites the poem by Hughes. The narrator muses on how similar here and there is.

"Tenebris" (00:36)

Davis recites the poem by Angelina Weld Grimke. The author comments on the blood and labor that slaves gave while working on plantations in the South.

"Sister Lou" (01:27)

Dee recites the poem by Sterling Brown. Brown incorporates southern dialect into his verse.

"When Malindy Sings" (01:13)

Davis recites the poem by Paul Laurence Dunbar. The narrator criticizes Miss Lucy, because she will never be able to sing well.

"Molly Means" (02:30)

Davis and Dee recite the poem by Margaret Walker. Molly Means cast a spell on another woman, and was cursed.

"Foreclosure" (01:36)

Davis and Dee recite the poem by Brown, which depicts the hardship and struggle for the African American.

"Incident" (00:37)

Dee recites the poem by Countee Cullen. The narrator relates the only event she remembers about visiting in Baltimore was a racial slur.

"A Bronzeville Mother Loiters in Mississippi. Meanwhile, A Mississippi Mother Burns Bacon" (08:15)

Brooks wrote this poem about the wife of the man who murdered Emmett Till. Watch Dee recite the poem in its entirety.

"For a Poet" (01:30)

Macandrew thanks publishers for allowing the poems to be heard on "Camera Three." Listen to Davis and Dee perform the poem by Cullen.

Credits: Great African-American Poetry Performed (00:35)

Credits: Great African-American Poetry Performed

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Great African-American Poetry Performed


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3-Year Streaming Price: $129.95

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Description

On this episode of Camera Three, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee perform poetry about the African-American experience. Excerpts include verses from Paul Laurence Dunbar, Sterling Brown, Frank Horne, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Margaret Walker. 

Length: 28 minutes

Item#: BVL128272

ISBN: 978-1-64023-091-0

Copyright date: ©1960

Closed Captioned

Performance Rights

Prices include public performance rights.

Not available to Home Video customers.


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